Plastic Bag and Polystyrene Ban

City of GLOUCESTER Ordinance Proposal

An INITIATIVE of Gloucester Clean City Commission

 
 

Seaside Sustainability has teamed up with Gloucester’s Clean City Commission, under the leadership of City Councillors Melissa Cox & Sean Nolan, to propose a ban in Gloucester on all single use plastic bags and polystyrene (Styrofoam) containers (like coffee cups and takeout food containers). This initiative is imperative in maintaining the beauty and health of our coastal city’s land & marine spaces.  Considering the availability of biodegradable and reusable alternatives, as well as the economic benefits of the proposed ordinance, through this partnership we will work to educate the citizens of Gloucester in order to accomplish this goal collaboratively.  

 

Local Youth Join The Effort

Students from Gloucester High school and Landmark School drop off information letters about the proposed Plastic Bag & Polystyrene Ban Ordinance & gather petition signatures at local Gloucester businesses to get the word out and gain support for this important cause.

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Too Many Bags

Momentary convenience, permanent damage

Plastic bags are used for an average of 12 minutes, but a single plastic bag has a life expectancy of up to 1,000 years. 

Every year, Americans discard 100 billion single-use plastic bags.  Almost 15.3 million plastic bags are used annually in Gloucester alone. 


Coastal Towns Lead the Way

Plastic Bag & Polystyrene Ordinances

Cities and towns along the coast of the U.S. have been particularly vigilant in implementing similar bans, and between 2015 and 2016, 23 states proposed regulations of single use plastic bags and/or polystyrene. The proposed Gloucester ordinance is similar to those already passed in dozens of cities and towns in Massachusetts, including our neighbors Ipswich, Manchester, Marblehead, and Newburyport.  The importance becomes especially relevant considering a recent investigation of Gloucester Harbor using an underwater ROV (remotely operated vehicle) in which observers reported abundant plastic bags and Styrofoam cups littering the ocean floor.

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By 2050, the oceans will contain more plastic than fish. A recent study found that 25% of fish sold in supermarkets contain plastic debris. 
— International Journal of Scientific Reports

Click to enlarge info graphic, courtesy of One World One Ocean

Hurting future Generations

Non-renewable destruction

Plastic bags are created from non-renewable resources and contribute to global warming. More than 1.6 billion gallons of oil are required annually for plastic bag production.   The plastic bags used in Gloucester alone are responsible for the emissions of 407.7 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year. 

Plastic bags are destroying our oceans. Approximately 8 million metric tons of plastic debris enters the world’s oceans each year.

Plastic bags kill wildlife. Bags are often mistaken as food by both domestic and wild animals and prove fatal when digested. As microscopic particles, plastic displaces plankton in the marine food chain.
 


53 cities and towns in Massachusetts have passed bag bans.

NOW IT'S GLOUCESTER'S TURN


Plastic bags are a major source of litter. Even when disposed properly, bags end up in trees, gutters, roadsides, and waterways thanks to their light weight and aerodynamic qualities.

Plastic bags are a major source of litter. Even when disposed properly, bags end up in trees, gutters, roadsides, and waterways thanks to their light weight and aerodynamic qualities.


For more information, or with questions, contact Eric Magers:

magerse@seasidesustainability.org

Follow this initiative's progress on Facebook!

Ban the Bag Gloucester


Landmark School students photographed outside Jim's Bagels in Gloucester.

Landmark School students photographed outside Jim's Bagels in Gloucester.